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Archive for April, 2012

Midnight In the Garden of Good and Evil book and film

Author Allison Hoover Bartlett mentions another nonfiction classic author and book – John Berendt’s Mightnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (page 205, The Man Who Loved Books Too Much). Both the book and the film based on the story are available for check out at the Lisle Library.

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Author Allison Hoover Bartlett mentions "In Cold Blood," "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down," "The Professor and The Madman," and "The Orchid Thief" as some of her favorite works of narrative nonfiction she considers collecting.( "The Man Who Loved Books Too Much" page 128)

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The Pale King by David Foster Wallace, Swamplandia by Karen Russell, and Train Dreams by Denis Johnson

The Pulitizer Prize winners were just announced, but for the first time since 1977 there is no winner for fiction. The Pale King by David Foster Wallace, Swamplandia by Karen Russell, and Train Dreams by Denis Johnson were all finalists, but none won the majority needed to be named a Pulitzer Prize winner. All three are great books that are available at The Lisle Library.

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Charlotte's Web

Charlotte's Web

Author Allison Hoover Bartlett says her “most important book-as-object” from her childhood is Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White (page 20). What’s your most important book-as-object?

 

 

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Covers for Booked For The Day's April - July selections

Book Covers of Booked For The Day’s April – July Selections

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Major Pettigrew's last Stand: A Novel  Monday April 2, Booked for the Day met to discuss the novel Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand; the story of the widower Major Pettigrew and shop-keeper widow Mrs. Ali, and their families and follies in the fictional sea-side town of Edgecomb St. Mary.

Overall everyone seemed to enjoy the book; and much of the discussion centered around how the story is told entirely from the point of view of the protagonist; Major Ernest Pettigrew. This left many in group feeling that maybe not every character’s point-of-view was able to be understood. Everyone did enjoy that the Major was a flawed character though; even though he is the hero of the tale he doesn’t always do or say the right thing. Also many side characters were still discussed at length; like the Major’s son – Roger, and fellow Edgecomb St. Mary resident and friend to all, Grace.

The character of Abdul Wahid, and his particular the ending climatic scene, also sparked discussion. Many thought it the scene seemed inconsistent with the rest of the story. However, everyone did enjoy the epilogue; some even wishing that it had been a bit longer or revealed more about the character’s lives.

In general, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand was a book everyone enjoyed reading!

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